hex appeal are playing this super excellent artist showcase for the brilliant group exhibition i didn’t want flowers, i wanted you to fuck me. it’s our first time playing in the big smoke alongside fantastic aural & visual female artists & i’m super excited to be part of this. we play on the 18th of october but the exhibition runs from the 13th to the 19th so don’t miss out! check it out;

Women’s mental health is an area much stigmatised though socially ingrained ideas of “female hysteria”. For women artists suffering from mental illness, finding safe spaces free of this prejudice to showcase their work can prove extremely difficult. 

This is why Anthea LeBrocq, an activist for women and young people in the arts, has taken it upon herself to put together the inaugural exhibition of ‘I Didn’t Want Flowers, I Wanted You To Fuck Me’. Featuring 15 talented young women, the exhibition provides space for each artist to creatively express their experiences with anxiety, depression, borderline personality disorder, and addiction.

While more women than men are affected by mental illness in Australia, the self-stigmatisation of young women with mental disorders is still highly prevalent. This stems from a culturally internalised reaction to dismiss to women’s mental issues as just “hysteria” or “overreacting”.

'I Didn't Want Flowers, I Wanted You To Fuck Me' aims to create a space free from this stigma - the exhibition will be partnering with Sydney Grrrls Club, an organisation devoted towards placing an honest, respectful and safe environment for young women online and Grrrls To The Front Festival, a celebration of women in the arts.

'I Didn't Want Flowers, I Wanted You To Fuck Me' will run from October 13th to 19th at TAP Gallery, Burton Street Darlinghurst, and features work by Lizzie Nagy, Leah Jean, Ellie Rose, Amelia Rose, Georgia Denton, Ellen Virgona, Alexis Aquino, Anthea LeBrocq, Maddy Carroll, Maddy Young, Susanna Rose Sykes, Arielle Nguyen, Renae Titchmarsh, Naomi Beveridge and Alice Amsel.

Opening night is on the 13th of October and will run from 6-9 PM, with complimentary alcoholic refreshments.

Ten weeks dry: water is still a privilege, not a right, in Indigenous Australia ›

mewnette:

this is my favourite moment in all of Simpsons history

(from S04E02)

(via etteette)

beehivin’ workshop 

snapchatting:

what is flirting it sounds dangerous

(via evianwater2002)

chadbroeger:

But I shouldn’t complain, Sydney was great as always. I ate Shenkin, drank too much, and saw Nervous Habit play a second show that didn’t feel like a second show at all - s/o to good friends doing good things!

thanks for being supportive & saying real nice things about us!!! means a lot when good eggs in bands you love like your band! :) :) see you when we play brissy legend!

(via theusualbad)

Eye movements made by subjects while examining I. E. Repin’s painting “An Unexpected Visitor”, with different questions in mind.

(via euceae)

i get so astounded when you say “no” or “stop” to a sexual encounter and people just go “ok” and don’t try to convince you or ask you to justify why or indicate verbally that they respect your decision but then just stomp and huff around afterwards. it is what i demand but never expect, especially from men. but this happened on the weekend & i’m having a weird time negotiating it. 

#consent  

In the 1890s, when Freud was in the dawn of his career, he was struck by how many of his female patients were revealing childhood [sexual] victimization to him. Freud concluded that child sexual abuse was one of the major causes of emotional disturbances in adult women and wrote a brilliant and humane paper called “The Aetiology of Hysteria.” However, rather than receiving acclaim from his colleagues for his ground-breaking insights, Freud met with scorn. He was ridiculed for believing that men of excellent reputation (most of his patients came from upstanding homes) could be perpetrators of incest.
Within a few years, Freud buckled under this heavy pressure and recanted his conclusions. In their place he proposed the “Oedipus complex,” which became the foundation of modern psychology… Freud used this construct to conclude that the episodes of abuse his clients had revealed to him had never taken place; they were simply fantasies of events the women had wished for… This construct started a hundred-year history in the mental health field of blaming victims for the abuse perpetrated on them and outright discrediting of women’s and children’s reports of mistreatment by men.

― Lundy Bancroft

(via proletarianprincess)

read this carve it into your brains permanently etch it into your skulls r e a d  t h i s

(via miss-mizi)

NEVER.
FORGET.

(via feministbatwoman)

WHAT

(via tarae)

(via tarae)

claudiaboleyn:

burntlikethesun:

loremipsumfandom:

fauxkaren:

quantumblog:

trying-to-resonate-concrete:

Dear STFU-Moffat and associates,

From now on, I insist you describe Steven Moffat as “Emmy-award winning writer Steven Moffat.” Just to make sure you’re being fair.

Emmy-award winning writer Steven Moffat is a queerbaiting hack

Emmy-award winning writer Steven Moffat’s writing features sexism and overly complicated plots that don’t really make any sense.

Emmy-award winning writer Steven Moffat has characters needlessly tell the viewer information that he should be showing them.

Emmy-award winning writer Steven Moffat is incapable of creating real emotional stakes in his stories.

Emmy-award winning writer Steven Moffat calls teenage mother a ‘slut’ in DVD commentary

Emmy-award winning writer Steven Moffat says bisexuals are too busy having sex to watch television, and therefore don’t need representing.

Emmy-award winning writer Steven Moffat thinks asexuals are too boring to write about. 

(via stfu-moffat)

i am too sick for band prac today 😫 but at least i have cake! this is “Herman the German friendship cake”, a sourdough chain letter! this Herman is apple & cinnamon & i have two starters to give away! apply within. 

queenofsabah:

sizvideos:

Video

wow

as someone with a very very ‘foreign’ and ‘ambigious’ (in the sense that the linguistic origin of my surname can’t be placed by a lot of anglo-australians) this really validates my suspicion that i’m not getting called back for a lot of jobs i am qualified for because of these internalised, maybe conscious, maybe not, ideas we have about migrants. 

like, as a kid, i had a lot of shame about my name. the first name everyone knows me by, the spelling & the pronunciation, is anglicised & now as an adult, i also have this shame of like pandering to white-anglo-australia, even tho it was a necessary survival strategy. and also, this ‘shame’ about passing as an ‘aussie’ because i am white and speak with an australian accent. i guess in a way i feel like it erases or renders invisible the specificity of my history. i dunno. i dunno.

(via lilslumberprince)

just remember ›

themodernistwitch:

If you are a woman or nonbinary person who plays music, your appearance will always be scrutinized and reviewed to the nth degree and torn apart to examine your fuckability or lack thereof (of course if you are a trans woman there are extra layers of bigotry to deal with, and nonbinary people who…

(via sodawound)

ethiopienne:

on today’s episode of me having feelings, a series of tweets about “anti-rape nail polish.”

(via merenneiti)